Studying for half an hour every day is beneficial for the brain and life

Studies can improve blood flow to the brain and increase the average age. Photo: File

 

 

While studying improves personality, it also increases your knowledge. Now it has been revealed that reading novels, stories or short stories etc. for half an hour every day has a positive effect on the brain. Adding it to the routine can also increase the age.

 

Some research has shown that studying reduces depression and also improves memory. However, experts at Stanford University have now said that reading literature, fiction and fiction improves blood flow in the brain. In one experiment, some participants were given to read Jane Austen's novels. During this time, his brain scan was taken, which showed that blood flow throughout the brain had improved. This proves that reading fiction has a good effect on the whole mind.

 

 

Explaining the scientific reason for this, experts have said that when we study a story of fiction, our brain is the concept of the details described i.e. fragrance, taste, scenes, sounds and other scenes. In this way, many parts of the brain are consumed. Then according to every word, the processing of language starts in the brain and it is very beneficial.

 

 

According to Dr Raymond Meir, a neurologist at New York University, the study of fiction increases kindness, personal skills and skills. Because the part of the brain from which we understand stories is like the process of understanding people. In this way, we can understand people better through studies, they can also be aware of their feelings and thoughts. ‘

 

 

On the other hand, yale university experts have said that if a person studies for 30 minutes daily in the dominant part of age, then the average age can increase by 23 months compared to those who do not read.


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Health benefits of avocado seeds. They lower Cholesterol

The cyber war in Russia: Both sides sabotage each other with digital hand grenades

How can we protect our children from obesity?